Spring Equinox Celebration & 108 Sun Salutations at TSA

Celebrate the arrival of the Spring Equinox by working towards 108 sun salutations…

March 24, 9-11 PM at TSA

“Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you.” -Maori Proverb

Melt away the winter months and give yourself permission to let loose and let go for a dynamic, fun filled evening at our Arlington studio, saluting the sun 108 times in celebration of the Spring Equinox. Led by Dibora Amanuel, Lisa Calandriello, Jodi Darlage, Lauren Dunn, Jennifer Hamilton, Anu Sawkar, Mary Catherine Starr, and Jennifer Triassi, we will move through variations of Stepback Sun Salutations, Surya Namaskar A and Surya Namaskar B. Feel free to cater the number and the flow to your level of experience. Repetition in movement allows for the body to come into a serene meditative flow. All proceeds will benefit the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. $20 suggested donation. You can sign up online here.

Read on for more details on the event, the significance of the number 108, and for more information on how to prepare!

The Spring Equinox represents a change in seasons, and it is celebrated by doing 108 Sun Salutations. Typically this ritual is performed 4 times a year, with the start of each season, to acknowledge the changing world around us. It usually takes about 1 1/2 – 2 hours to complete for those who elect to do all 108 Sun Salutations. It challenges your overall strength, stamina, and your mind. Many people believe that doing 108 Sun Salutations is a way of breaking out of the darkness that accumulated from the long winter. It’s a way of “spring cleaning,” your body and your mind.

Significance of 108

The 108 salutation practice is named a Mala, representing the 108 mala (prayer) beads (plus one for the “guru bead,” around which the other 108 beads turn like the planets around the sun). A mala is used for counting as you repeat a mantra—much like the Catholic rosary, which also contains 108 beads. The number’s significance is open to interpretation, but 108 has long been considered a sacred number in Yoga as well as in many religions and cultures.

- There were initially 54 sounds in the Sanskrit alphabet: 2 X 54 = 108

- There are 108 Upanishads, which are part of the oldest scriptural texts of Hinduism. They primarily focus on philosophy, meditation, and the nature of God.

- There are 108 names for Hindu deities.

- The distance between the earth and sun is 108 times the diameter of the sun, therefore, the number 108 is taken to represent the “distance” from the devotee to the divine.

- Some say there are 108 feelings: 36 related to the past, 36 related to the present, and 36 related to the future.

-108 is the Chinese number representing man

108 is six times the number 18, which is a Jewish number representing good luck

-There are even 108 stitches on a baseball!

How can you prepare for the TSA Spring Equinox event?

Before the practice:

  • Set a goal : similar to training for a race, set your own personal goal for the number of sun salutations you would like to complete during the practice
  • Brush up: sign up for a few classes between now and then to brush up on the basics of a step back sun salutations, surya namaskar A, and surya namaskar B. Let the teacher know before or after class if you have questions about alignment, the flow, etc.
  • Develop your home practice: start or end your day with sun salutes! It’s a great way to get the body ready and get used to flowing from one pose to the next.
  • Practice a little self-care. Listen to your body. Take a break when needed. Rest the day of the “big event.”


During the practice:

  • Feel free to tailor the number of sun salutations that you complete to what feels best for you. Come out for 10, 20, 54, or aim for all 108!
  • Modify the series in a way that feels best for your body
  • Take breaks as needed, resting in child’s pose, savasana, or stepping outside of the studio to grab some water.
  • Flow at your own pace if you are comfortable with the sequence


Hope to see you there!

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